Safer Streets Header Supporting Research

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To support you in your efforts to create safer streets in your neighbourhood, we have collected research and data from around the world about the best safety practices.

Why lower speeds

Effectiveness of 30km/h speed limits

Studies from around the world have taken a closer look at the effectiveness of lower speed limits in residential areas and found them to be effective at lowering speeds and improving safety.

Compliance with lower speed limits

One concern about lowering speed limits is that they may frustrate drivers and create a false sense of security. However, lower speed limits have proven to be particularly effective on local roads.

Traffic calming

Effectiveness of pedestrian crossings

Other intersection and crossing treatments

Further Reading

For a more in-depth exploration of existing studies and policies, download our  Safer Streets Near Schools Literature and Policy Review

And for some additional local research, read Linda Rothman’s study on parents’ perceptions of school traffic safety: summary or full article.


References

  1. Garrard, J., Rissel, C., & Bauman, A. (2012). Health benefits of cycling. In Pucher J. & Buehler R. (Eds.), City Cycling (pp. 31-54). The MIT Press.
    McDonald, N.C. (2012). Children and cycling. In Pucher J. & Buehler R. (Eds.), City Cycling (pp. 235-256). The MIT Press.
    O’Brien, C., Ramanathan, S., Gilbert, R. & Orsini, A. (2009). Youth and Sustainable Transportation: A review of the literature. Retrieved from http://www.kidsonthemove.ca
  2. Litman, T. (2004). Economic Value of Walkability. World Transport Policy and Practice, 10(1). Retrieved from http://vtpi.org/walkability.pdf
  3. Drennen, E. (2003). Economic effects of traffic calming on urban small businesses. Department of
    Public Administration, San Francisco State University, San Francisco. Retrieved from http://www.sfbike.org/download/bikeplan/bikelanes.pdf
  4. Lindenmann, H. P. (2005). The effects on road safety of 30 kilometer-per-hour zone signposting in residential districts. Institute of Transportation Engineers. ITE Journal, 75(6), 50-54.
  5. Grundy, C., Steinbach, R., Edwards, P., Green, J., Armstrong, B., & Wilkinson, P. (2009). Effect of 20 mph traffic speed zones on road injuries in London, 1986-2006: controlled interrupted time series analysis. Bmj, 339.
  6. World Health Organization (WHO). (2013). Pedestrian safety: a road safety manual for decisionmakers and practitioners. World Health Organization. Retrieved from http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/79753/1/9789241505352_eng.pdf
  7. Rossy, G. M., Sun, C. C., Jessen, D., & Newman, E. (2012). Residential Speed Limit Reduction Case Studies. Open Transportation Journal, 6, 39-45.
  8. Kattan, L., Tay, R., & Acharjee, S. (2011). Managing speed at school and playground zones. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 43(5), 1887-1891.
  9. Elvik, R., (2001). Area-wide urban traffic calming schemes: a meta-analysis of safety effects. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 33(3), 327-336.
  10. World Health Organization (WHO). (2013). Pedestrian safety: a road safety manual for decisionmakers and practitioners. World Health Organization. Retrieved from http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/79753/1/9789241505352_eng.pdf
  11. Van Houten, R., La Plante, L., & Gustafson, T. (2012). Evaluating pedestrian safety improvements: Final report. Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved from http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_Research_Report_RC-1585_408249_7.pdf
    World Health Organization (WHO). (2013). Pedestrian safety: a road safety manual for decisionmakers and practitioners. World Health Organization. Retrieved from http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/79753/1/9789241505352_eng.pdf
  12. Arason, N. (2014). No Accident: Eliminating Injury and Death on Canadian Roads. Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press.
    Van Houten, R., La Plante, L., & Gustafson, T. (2012). Evaluating pedestrian safety improvements: Final report. Michigan Department of Transportation. Retrieved from http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdot/MDOT_Research_Report_RC-1585_408249_7.pdf
  13. Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE). (2010). Designing walkable urban thoroughfares: A context sensitive approach. Retrieved from http://library.ite.org/pub/e1cff43c-2354-d714-51d9-d82b39d4dbad
  14. Retting, R.A., Ferguson, S.A. & McCartt, A.T. (2003). A review of evidence-based traffic engineering measures designed to reduce pedestrian-motor vehicle crashes. American Journal of Public Health.
    93(9): 1456-1463.

Guide to Safer Streets Near Schools

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