#BuildTheVisionTO 2018 Election Survey Responses – Mayoral Candidates

Ten mayoral candidates completed the survey. A number chose only to leave comments, rather than yes/no responses. Each question and the responses received are listed below, along with the paragraph rationale that was provided to the candidates (‘Read more’). You can also download a spreadsheet of all mayoral candidate responses.

1. Do you commit to supporting the implementation of a city-wide default speed limit of 30 km/h on all residential streets and 40 km/h on all arterial and collector roads?

wdt_ID Candidate Q1 Answer Q1 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes
2 Gallay, Mike Yes I support 30 km/h limits on residential roads and 40 km/h limits on arterial roads. There are some multi-lane collector roads which could have 45-50 km/h limits, at least as a graduated ramp-down, so I would leave room for some discussion.
3 Graff, Brian No This will not be enforced, and is too low for many streets.
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer I’m committed to reducing the speed limit on all residential streets to 30km an hour, Right now we have a confusing patchwork of speed limits on our residential roads. We need to send a consistent message that drivers must go more slowly on the streets where our children walk and play
5 Nath, Gautam Yes Yes for sure!
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes Yes, partially. In my own Mayoral platform, I initially indicated that road speeds be reduced to 30km- then I tested what that meant in actuality on a ‘main’ side road and found that the vehicle I was in felt like it was hardly moving (like when someone is first learning to drive) and slowed down all the cars behind us causing ‘traffic’ behind us. The 40km speed seemed to be a reasonable adjustment to both being able to stop quickly and safely and to allow reasonable movement of traffic. Residential streets, school zones, near Seniors Residences, care homes and hospitals should all be zoned to have road speed reduced to 30km. I also believe that there should be car free weekends in various parts of Toronto with the goal of having car fee zones once we can ensure accessibility needs and provisions are met for commuters with mobility challenges. Having said all that, reducing speed is one necessary step to ensuring safety in road use- street infrastructure must be updated. As your Mayor, together we will ensure that a citywide implementation of protected bike lanes, integrated traffic lights, an adaptation of the Dutch junction design to improve road safety & use and any other infrastructure and/or policies and By-laws necessary to ensure that we all have the ability to live & thrive!
7 Ruel, Jim No
8 Sears, Dr James No
9 Weenen, Jack No Neighbourhood residential should be set at 30 but lowering arteries to 40 becomes abusive when it comes to streets like Bayview, for example. This isn’t a law that can be blanketed over the city.
14 Tory, John Thank you very much for sharing #BuildTheVisionTO: Safe and Active Streets for All, and for giving me the opportunity to respond to your candidate survey regarding improving road safety, increasing physical activity and building safe and active streets for all. Road safety for all road users is a top priority; it is worthy of our investment, attention and action. I am a strong supporter of Vision Zero and, as a City government, we are working on a range of solutions and initiatives to achieve this goal. As part of the Vision Zero plan, we launched a pilot for Toronto’s first automated speed enforcement program in school zones. I convinced the previous Provincial government to change the law and allow the use of this technology to improve road safety. We are now piloting this technology in several school zones, and will roll it out across Toronto in 2019. As you note, in June 2018, the Public Works & Infrastructure Committee adopted a staff report to designate all K-8 schools as Community Safety Zones. I will work with staff to ensure this is implemented as soon as possible, or by 2022. In addition, the City will be carefully evaluating any and all additional areas of Toronto that would benefit from reduced speed limits, based on staff recommendations. Currently, local roads are under the purview of local community councils, to ensure that neighbourhoods are consulted carefully on changes that impact them.

2. Do you commit to supporting the streamlining of the traffic calming process?

wdt_ID Candidate Q2 Answer Q2 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes
2 Gallay, Mike Yes Because there aren't one-size-fits-all solutions to implement given how massive Toronto is and how diversely it's grown in parts, and because we have to embrace a chorus of different solutions, it will be difficult to have a perfectly streamlined process. However, I think it's an admirable goal, and one that is about having a civic attitude towards traffic calming which is agreed upon, rather than just an administrative route.
3 Graff, Brian No The process should be reivewed but still needs proper oversight and public input.
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer Yes We have to make it simpler for neighborhoods to identify road safety issues and get traffic calming measures in place.
5 Nath, Gautam Yes Totally required, Also having the word ‘Relax’ superimposed on all red light signals so the driver subliminally gets calm and does not rush.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes
7 Ruel, Jim Yes
8 Sears, Dr James No
9 Weenen, Jack Yes We should be using bolt in speed humps, they are faster and cheaper to install, proven to last longer and don’t affect bicycles.
10 Tory, John Additionally, there are a number of common-sense measures that have been initiated under my leadership. For example, we are streamlining the traffic calming process. In March 2018, I seconded a motion to change the timeline processes for bylaws to implement traffic calming measures in school and community safety zones. As a result, staff reported back with several measures we are using to efficiently implement traffic calming measures, including reducing the required polling response rate from 50 plus one percent to 25 percent, and permitting Transportation Services to report directly to Community Council on traffic safety measures in school and community safety zones.

3. Do you commit to supporting the implementation of traffic calming at all elementary school zones by 2022?

wdt_ID Candidate Q3 Answer Q3 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes
2 Gallay, Mike Yes I'm not specifically a proponent of safety cameras as I believe while they do have an assistive aspect after the fact, they do little if anything to slow a car in motion, and their costs can be considerable. That said, I certainly commit to supporting calming traffic in all school zones, particularly with regard to changes in landscape which make slowing down unavoidable.
3 Graff, Brian No Some elementary schools are on arterial roads. We need speed limits and signage that are electronic and adjust to circumstances so that it is safe in hours when children are on the streets but not impacting traffic at night or at other times.
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer I’ll ensure all schools zones are safe by design in five years. Signs and cameras aren’t enough. Our school zones should be models of streets and walkways that are safe by design.
5 Nath, Gautam Yes Yes, signage is not good, bumps and self measuring signs that tell you your speed work well. Part of the education tax can pay for this.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes
7 Ruel, Jim Yes
8 Sears, Dr James No
9 Weenen, Jack Yes
10 Tory, John As you note, in June 2018, the Public Works & Infrastructure Committee adopted a staff report to designate all K-8 schools as Community Safety Zones. I will work with staff to ensure this is implemented as soon as possible, or by 2022. In addition, the City will be carefully evaluating any and all additional areas of Toronto that would benefit from reduced speed limits, based on staff recommendations. Currently, local roads are under the purview of local community councils, to ensure that neighbourhoods are consulted carefully on changes that impact them. We have also launched an Active and Safe Routes to School Pilot Project, which brings together the City and the school boards to increase student participation in Active Safe Routes and increase safety and comfort of walking conditions along designated walking/biking routes to school. This will include new signs and markings which will be installed along the walking/cycling routes around each school.

4. Do you commit to supporting adding a sidewalk on at least one side of the street when an opportunity such as road reconstruction arises, in line with City policy?

wdt_ID Candidate Q4 Answer Q4 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes I believe our neighbourhood streets need a safe walking paths, and I absolutely support infrastructure that makes walking safe. I have heard concerns in some neighbourhoods over the cutting down of large numbers of mature trees to create sidewalks. I do not believe we should be choosing between safety and trees/green space. I believe sidewalks must be created on existing road space, or, if that is not feasible for some reason, a suitable solution (for instance protected walking paths) rather than sidewalks should be created, as long as it still protects vulnerable pedestrians.
2 Gallay, Mike Yes Absolutely. It is maddening as a pedestrian to navigate a road without at least one sidewalk, particularly in inclement weather, which we receive plenty of in Toronto. The City almost always owns enough space at the foot of most properties to include a sidewalk, so much so that I am surprised the adding of a sidewalk wouldn't be essentially mandated during any road reconstruction.
3 Graff, Brian No I grew up in Don Mills on a street with no sidewalks. There are parts of the city where sidewalks are not needed or wanted by residents.
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer Yes
5 Nath, Gautam Yes I wonder if we could conduct a Community social service drive to have families commit an amount that covers just their lawn area to add a sidewalk and bill this into the property tax as a one time. They can also donate one or more to compensator those who cannot afford it.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes
7 Ruel, Jim Yes
8 Sears, Dr James Yes
9 Weenen, Jack Yes
10 Tory, John Whenever roads are reconstructed, I support the installation of new sidewalks, in consultation with local communities.

5. Do you commit to supporting a minimum 2.1 metre pedestrian clearway for sidewalks on all arterial and collector roads?

wdt_ID Candidate Q5 Answer Q5 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes As with the previous question, my answer here is to make sure the clearway is created not at the expense of other community amenities, like trees, or sidewalk patios, but instead widened by using existing road space. In the picture accompanying this question, bicycles are in the way of the person in the wheelchair. If the posts were placed so that the bicycle parking were on the road (and protected there), there would be far more space for the pedestrian. Wherever possible, we should maximize our use of road space rather than having different but important uses competing for a narrow amount of sidewalk space. Accessibility is paramount.
2 Gallay, Mike Yes This is a yes, with conditions. The City has not been built with the same road and setback dimensions all over. Where it is not possible, I don't believe this type of mandate without condition is possible or reasonable. For all road reconstruction, certainly. Where there is space allowing, certainly. But it would need to be a guideline more than a mandate.
3 Graff, Brian Yes Unfortunately, in some areas like Queen Street in The Beach where I live there is an obsession by City bureaucrats and planners with having tree planters even where sidewalks are not wide enough.
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer Yes
5 Nath, Gautam Yes However a study needs to be done to cost its feasibility and a phased way out. I would look for corporate sponsorship to support corridors while giving them publicity.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes
7 Ruel, Jim No
8 Sears, Dr James No
9 Weenen, Jack Yes
10 Tory, John City staff are currently reviewing a harmonized patio by-law to address the minimum clearance requirements on our City’s sidewalks, in consultation with local communities, businesses and the accessibility community. I look forward to the results of this consultation and the opportunity to harmonize the City’s rules and regulations to ensure that appropriate sidewalk clearances are maintained and businesses are not negatively impacted by any changes that may result.

6. Do you commit to supporting building protected bike lanes on main streets, including the major corridors identified in The Cycling Network Plan?

wdt_ID Candidate Q6 Answer Q6 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes Absolutely.
2 Gallay, Mike Yes Yes, I support building protected bike lanes on main streets including those cited in the 10-Year Network Plan. That said, I have my own ideas and initiatives regarding cyclist safety and network building which go beyond what's laid out in the plan.
3 Graff, Brian No Many bike lanes are not needed or are poorly designed, such as the one on Woodbine. In the core, bike lanes are limiting traffic flow and a major reason why congestion is worse in areas like around Roy Thompson Hall.
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer Yes
5 Nath, Gautam Yes I say yes but then would want to see the financials.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes Please also refer to my answer to question 1; it includes my platform, as your Mayor, to implement citywide plans for “road safety use infrastructure for Toronto”.
7 Ruel, Jim Yes
8 Sears, Dr James No Bicycle seats lead to erectile dysfunction.
9 Weenen, Jack No In many instances I wholeheartedly support this initiative however, using 2 quick examples: Woodbine, which was used as an extremely effective artery has been clogged for a bikelane in what many consider a “driving neighbourhood”. Secondly, the bike lane recently created on Bellevue ave was placed in a FIRE ROUTE and required switching the side of the road for parking thus complicating things for people with driveways. Most of the complaints I’ve heard from this new lane is from the fire department themselves! Like the speed limit proposals, this is not an issue with a blanket solution. We must be more selective of our routing
10 Tory, John I know that central to the Vision Zero Plan is creating a network of safe, separated bike lanes. The Ten Year Cycling Plan we approved through City Council identifies approximately 525 centreline km of new cycling infrastructure to be built over the life of the plan. We will invest $154M to implement this plan, and will look to accelerate the plan, whenever possible, as we have with the Vision Zero plan over the past two years. Over the course of my term, Toronto has added nearly 50 km of new bike lanes and 13 km of trails. This includes important projects like the Bloor Street Bike Lanes, which were made permanent under my leadership, after being discussed for more than ten years.

7. For Council candidates, do you commit to supporting building safe, connected routes in your ward as identified in the 10-Year Cycling Network Plan? For Mayoral candidates, do you commit to supporting building safe, connected routes in each ward as identified in the 10-Year Cycling Network Plan?

wdt_ID Candidate Q7 Answer Q7 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes
2 Gallay, Mike Yes I'll echo my comments here as were written under the last question.
3 Graff, Brian No
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer Yes
5 Nath, Gautam No Am not a council candidate.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes Building safe, connected routes is a citywide. It’s a mandatory part of my platform, as your Mayor, so we’ll get it done! Your vote to elect me, D!ONNE Renée, as Mayor of Toronto ensures that we get this done! Together we succeed!
7 Ruel, Jim Yes
8 Sears, Dr James No Bicycle seats lead to erectile dysfunction.
9 Weenen, Jack Yes
10 Tory, John I know that central to the Vision Zero Plan is creating a network of safe, separated bike lanes. The Ten Year Cycling Plan we approved through City Council identifies approximately 525 centreline km of new cycling infrastructure to be built over the life of the plan. We will invest $154M to implement this plan, and will look to accelerate the plan, whenever possible, as we have with the Vision Zero plan over the past two years. Over the course of my term, Toronto has added nearly 50 km of new bike lanes and 13 km of trails. This includes important projects like the Bloor Street Bike Lanes, which were made permanent under my leadership, after being discussed for more than ten years.

8. Do you commit to supporting accelerating the Cycling Network Plan to be built in the next four years?

wdt_ID Candidate Q8 Answer Q8 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes
2 Gallay, Mike Yes
3 Graff, Brian No
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer Yes A connected network of protecting bike lanes will make our roads safer for all users.
5 Nath, Gautam Yes Yes based on financials the it’s potential savings in lives and in gasoline spends.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes I believe that bike lane infrastructure should be on every street in Toronto.
7 Ruel, Jim No
8 Sears, Dr James No Bicycle seats lead to erectile dysfunction.
9 Weenen, Jack Yes However, this shouldn’t be rushed if we continue to put the bike lanes in the WRONG places. Most cyclists don’t know how to properly go straight in a lane switch intersection and most drivers don’t understand how to cope with dotted bike lanes for a right turn.
10 Tory, John I know that central to the Vision Zero Plan is creating a network of safe, separated bike lanes. The Ten Year Cycling Plan we approved through City Council identifies approximately 525 centreline km of new cycling infrastructure to be built over the life of the plan. We will invest $154M to implement this plan, and will look to accelerate the plan, whenever possible, as we have with the Vision Zero plan over the past two years. Over the course of my term, Toronto has added nearly 50 km of new bike lanes and 13 km of trails. This includes important projects like the Bloor Street Bike Lanes, which were made permanent under my leadership, after being discussed for more than ten years.

9. Do you commit to supporting increasing the use of automated traffic enforcement safety cameras?

wdt_ID Candidate Q9 Answer Q9 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes I believe this measure is important, but that it is only one part of the safety solution. In the long term, better street design will mean less need for these kinds of enforcement measures. However, in the short term, this is what we have available to us as a tool to change behaviour, so I support it.
2 Gallay, Mike Yes Whereas I have trepidation over placing cameras in every elementary school zone, as mentioned in an earlier question, I do feel red-light cameras can have a positive impact. That said, their visibility is far more important than their actual operation, as the latter is only for after-the-fact. I believe too many cameras are installed in sly ways and it defeats their ultimate purpose, which is not to better allow our courts to more easily prosecute violators, but to limit violations in the first place to increase our safety. I would only support increased use if they were made very visible.
3 Graff, Brian Yes Where appropriate. But cameras do not actually identify drivers and only lead to fines long after the fact, and certainly cyclists and pedestrians are not caught or told to change their behaviour.
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer Yes
5 Nath, Gautam No Too complicated!
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes Partially, yes if the automated traffic enforcement safety cameras are cost effective and will produce results such as fines so as to deter drivers from blocking intersections. Otherwise, this installation would be futile if there were no consequences and accountability. Someone physically present with a camera and issuing tickets at the intersection would be more effective and less expensive. This would also provide people with local jobs- which is a priority for me as your Mayoral Candidate. Notwithstanding, precautions would have to be taken regarding privacy concerns, data storage and data usage. The Public is not confident with Police Services’ ability to maintain data so another entity would be created should we proceed in implementing automated traffic enforcement safety cameras in Toronto.
7 Ruel, Jim Yes
8 Sears, Dr James No Stop contributing to the Orwellian Dystopia.
9 Weenen, Jack Yes Very supportive of this idea. We should also install automatic speed traps in the city with automatic billing.
10 Tory, John As part of the Vision Zero plan, we launched a pilot for Toronto’s first automated speed enforcement program in school zones. I convinced the previous Provincial government to change the law and allow the use of this technology to improve road safety. We are now piloting this technology in several school zones, and will roll it out across Toronto in 2019. During my time in office, I also championed red light cameras and brought forth a major expansion of them across our system. As part of the 2018 Road Safety Plan, we have installed red light cameras at 142 new locations, with seven currently being installed, with plan to double the overall number of cameras.

10. Do you commit to supporting prioritizing the safety of vulnerable road users by outlawing motor vehicle right turns on red?

wdt_ID Candidate Q10 Answer Q10 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes
2 Gallay, Mike No I do think this is worth further study, but I am not prepared to support an outlawing of right turns on red lights at this point. I am not convinced by the numbers presented that those fatalities of right-turning vehicles would be reduced whether the vehicle was turning on or not on a red light. Further, I don't know if it would have the effect of having more impatient drivers jumping red lights or speeding up at amber lights, or if traffic as a whole would suffer a considerable slow-down, particularly on one-lane roads, or two-lane roads with parking, etc. I am not opposed, but in these blanket YES or NO questions, it would inappropriate to support an outright outlawing of the behaviour at this point. I'm open to the discussion, however.
3 Graff, Brian No
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer I will transform 100 of Toronto’s most dangerous intersections within four years and develop an aggressive plan to redevelop the rest. With simple, known design elements that are part of the City’s Complete Streets guideline, we can make dangerous intersections safer for kids and everyone else.
5 Nath, Gautam Yes Yes, it helps calm them.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes Yes, partially. My answer in question 1 refers to integrated traffic lights. Integrated traffic lights would provide signalling to indicate when right turns could be made and when they could not be made. Similar to advance left hand turn lights, our integrated traffic lights would permit advance right hand turn lights on a red light. There would be a “no right turn” light symbol when main traffic light is green.
7 Ruel, Jim No
8 Sears, Dr James No
9 Weenen, Jack No Again, there comes a point when the system is abusive to drivers. Cyclists (I am personally a cyclist, and hate seeing this) are often seen flying by cars-their turn signals on-on the right side. Cyclists should go around the vehicles.
10 Tory, John …I will prioritize the safety of vulnerable road users by outlawing motor vehicle right turns on red in key areas where it makes sense.

11. Do you commit to supporting a controlled crossing at all bus and streetcar stops?

wdt_ID Candidate Q11 Answer Q11 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes Totally agree. However, this must go hand in hand with making sure that bus stops are still placed within appropriate maximum distances from each other. I would support this policy being implemented thoughtfully, so that it does not result in bus stops being removed.
2 Gallay, Mike Yes I support this, though I am not sure this could be solved with a streamlined process. It would be on a case-by-case basis as installing crosswalks (for example) on major roads may not be possible or plausible.
3 Graff, Brian No
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer Providing controlled crossings are one of the many tools I’ll employ in my plan to make 100 dangerous intersections and all elementary school zones safe.
5 Nath, Gautam Yes Would consider overheard corridors or underground ones again corporate sponsored!
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes Yes. A designated croswalk, a Transit Crossing Guard (walking talkie/mobile communication device to keep them company) on both sides of the street with a flashing helmet who operates the controlled signal flashing lights above the crosswalk. Necessary lighting makes this more effective. Transit Crossings Guards would be another new local job created. (Please note that all bus stops should have shelters, be well lit and have lighted bus stops with automated gps next bus referencing and a full schedule)
7 Ruel, Jim No
8 Sears, Dr James No
9 Weenen, Jack Yes
10 Tory, John When it comes to bus and streetcar stops, the City should be implementing increased numbers of controlled crossings wherever it is feasible.

12. Do you commit to supporting an implementation strategy for Toronto’s Complete Streets guidelines?

wdt_ID Candidate Q12 Answer Q12 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes
2 Gallay, Mike Yes
3 Graff, Brian No This is a planning fad.
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer Yes Implementing the Complete Streets guidelines is a critical part of taking a “Vision Zero” approach a requirement of every infrastructure and development project involving roads and sidewalks. Everything we construct must be built with the goal of zero pedestrian and cyclist fatalities on our streets.
5 Nath, Gautam Yes It is important yet has to be seen in light of all other proposals in front of the city vying for limited budgets.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes I believe in supporting and implementing any initiative that ensures that we all have the ability to live and thrive!
7 Ruel, Jim Yes
8 Sears, Dr James No Stop making our already-bloated bureaucracy EVEN MORE BLOATED! Spend the money on housing for seniors and veterans.
9 Weenen, Jack Yes Definitely time for more training and implementation strategies
10 Tory, John If re-elected, I will support the creation of an implementation strategy for Toronto’s Complete Streets Guidelines.

13. Do you commit to supporting the Transform Yonge option for Yonge Street between Sheppard and Finch Avenues?

wdt_ID Candidate Q13 Answer Q13 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes I commit to passing Transform Yonge once I am in office, without any further delay.
2 Gallay, Mike Yes I am a big proponent of bringing more accessibility and safety to streets particularly in the North York core. I believe it would have an excellent reverberating impact on nearby communities to encourage more cyclist and pedestrian transit. I support this initiative.
3 Graff, Brian No
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer Yes We can’t afford John Tory’s delays; our major streets need to be places that everyone can enjoy and feel safe. Transform Yonge turns a stretch of road that feels like a freeway into a vibrant and safe space for everyone.
5 Nath, Gautam Yes It is important yet has to be seen in light of all other proposals in front of the city vying for limited budgets.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes I believe in supporting and implementing any initiative that ensures that we all have the ability to live and thrive!
7 Ruel, Jim Yes
8 Sears, Dr James No Ask Alek Minassian his opinion.
9 Weenen, Jack Yes High time this happens, this should have been implemented years ago before the construction of the new developments
10 Tory, John I support bike lanes parallel to Yonge Street on Beecroft Avenue in North York, which was one of the recommendations put forward by our City staff as part of the Re-Imagine Yonge EA. I also support the reconstruction of Yonge Street to make way for improvements and walkability of the area, allowing for bigger and better sidewalks. This is a busy area and I believe there is a balance to be struck where we can make necessary improvements to the public realm, but also keep traffic moving.

14. Do you commit to supporting increasing the City of Toronto’s budget for achieving zero traffic deaths to $107M/year, which would bring it to the same per-capita level as New York City’s Vision Zero Action Plan, considered a leader in North America?

wdt_ID Candidate Q14 Answer Q14 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes I answered yes, but would like to quality this answer. I don't wish to commit to that exact number without consulting with Toronto transportation staff. I do commit to working with council to allocate a level of per capita spending on evidence-based measures far in excess of what we currently spend, to bring it much closer to the level of New York City. I commit to spending that higher level of per capita spending on measures that would actually reduce dangerous speeding and reduce the volume of automobile traffic, while improving the liveability of our neighbourhoods and allowing the flow of the maximum number of people throughout our city. I do not support spending money on ineffective measures.
2 Gallay, Mike No I won't commit to what I feel is a speculative expenditure at this point. If money will help the situation, then certainly it should be the focus of budget discussions. I believe there are lots of other factors why New York might have a higher per capita or overall expenditure and this particular figure feels flimsy to me. For example, where is the discussion of the increased pedestrian safety which comes from one-way streets, something New York is famous for? (And an aspect of Toronto roads which I feel is sorely lacking.) The $107m/year figure needs more substance before I commit to it specifically.
3 Graff, Brian No This is what the budgeting process is for every year - based on projects actually proving their merit against competing priorities.
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer I’ve laid out an aggressive plan to reduce speed limits, build protected bike lanes, and redesign 100 dangerous intersections and all elementary school zones to make them safe by design. I’ll make a “Vision Zero” approach a requirement of every infrastructure and development project involving roads and sidewalks. Everything we construct must be built with the goal of zero pedestrian and cyclist fatalities on our streets
5 Nath, Gautam Yes It is important yet has to be seen in light of all other proposals in front of the city vying for limited budgets. Without a detailed understanding, this is unfair to ask at this stage.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes If I understood the question correctly (it was confusing to me as I wasn’t sure if TCAT was asking for an increase of $107,000,000 or for the added increase to become the new budget total of $107,000,000/month which equals $535,000,000 over 5 years based on the figures provided). $80,300,000 to $535,000,000 is a significant jump in budget. Why? Yes, only if there is demonstration that this is a necessary figure to increase the budget to ensure that we all have the ability to live and thrive! Without valid justification it would be hard to increase any budget. Further, it may be more prudent to have a reserve budget and work with the figures given by the City Staff and Department to implement our citywide goals.
7 Ruel, Jim No
8 Sears, Dr James No If that money was used to feed and house the poor and mentally ill, we would save WAY MORE LIVES than what you are proposing. Do the math you moron!
9 Weenen, Jack No I am not sufficiently informed on this matter to say yes or no, therefore have answered no. Feel free to contact me with more information about this proposal.
10 Tory, John I am a strong supporter of Vision Zero and, as a City government, we are working on a range of solutions and initiatives to achieve this goal. Under my leadership, the City approved its first Vision Zero plan, and has accelerated and expanded its implementation. In 2018 alone, we have added $22 million to speed up implementation, which brings our total investment over five years to $109 million. With $22 million more committed to the Vision Zero plan this year, the City can roll out a number of road safety initiatives including speeding up road redesign initiatives, doubling the number of leading pedestrian intervals being installed this year from 40 to 80, research has shown that Leading Pedestrian Intervals can reduce pedestrian-vehicle collisions by as much as 60 per cent, installing zebra markings at up to 200 additional intersections, clearing the backlog of speed hump installations; and enhancing bike lanes along our 10 main cycling corridors including painting green lanes through intersections so drivers will have a visual reminder that there is a bike lane running right through the intersection and they must be alert. I plan to continue supporting the Vision Zero plan with serious investment, as Council has done under my leadership this term. On the matter of Toronto’s dramatically increased investment relative to that of other cities mentioned, one could only answer your question once we have in hand the basis on which those expenditures were calculated so as to ensure an apples-to-apples comparison.

15. Do you commit to supporting and funding a monthly Open Streets Toronto program from May to September in 2019 and beyond?

wdt_ID Candidate Q15 Answer Q15 Comment
1 Climenhaga, Sarah Yes Absolutely. I believe this is an important program for both safety and equity. It would be an extremely cost effective way of making our city far more liveable, safer and more equitable, and it could bring tremendous economic benefits from tourism, all while making us a global leader.
2 Gallay, Mike Yes
3 Graff, Brian No
4 Keesmaat, Jennifer Open Streets is a great program. I look forward to finding ways for the City to support expanding the program.
5 Nath, Gautam Yes Everything need not be funded by the city. We need to find other sources for funding to offset this.
6 Renée, D!ONNE Yes Yes, I am open to open streets. Please see my answer to question 1. #Inclusion empowers and fosters #CommunityWellness.
7 Ruel, Jim No
8 Sears, Dr James No
9 Weenen, Jack Yes This reflects directly into the city culture, absolute must
10 Tory, John Finally, with regard to supporting and funding a monthly Open Streets Toronto program from May to September in 2019 I am open to discussions with the organizers, who this year hosted one in August and one in September. The City of Toronto is only one of many great sponsors in the event and I will support our continuing to be a sponsor. As I said at the outset of this letter, road safety for all road users is a top priority, and has been during my term as Mayor. That said, I know we can do more. I remain steadfastly committed to safe, active transportation and will seek your help in all these areas if I am reelected.

 

TCAT has surveyed candidates on active transportation issues for every municipal election since its founding in 2006.  Read more about our past election surveys.